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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home

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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Let’s look to the inside of a Dreamy Modern 1950s home
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Today we look at the inside of a dream house with a mid-century style that will take your breath away.  We are talking about a  five-bedroom Mediterranean-style home spread in the Los Angeles. Is a classic 1950s home with sweeping vistas of the San Gabriel mountains and valley.

The house was designed by Harold B. Zook, a notable but lesser-known architect who worked with modernist maestro Albert Frey in Palm Springs before hanging his shingle in Pasadena.

Although the bones of the structure were fairly intact, additions and interior emendations implemented in the early 1990s obscured the structure’s spruce modern lines and quintessential mid-century vibe.

The house belongs nothing more nothing less to the actress Mandy Moore who assembled a formidable team including architect Emily Farnham, interior designer Sarah Sherman Samuel, and Terremoto landscape designers, all of whom worked in close collaboration from the outset of the project.

“We looked at the house and realized that we could bring it back with some basic subtraction, as opposed to a complete gut renovation,” Farnham says, referring to dated surface treatments, dark oak built-ins, and, most significant, a pair of semicircular volumes attached to the kitchen and master bath.

“The rounded forms made no sense with all the taut, rectilinear lines. We had to shave those warts off,” the architect explains.

With touches of contemporary, high and low, feminine and masculine. It still’s a simply light, bright, clean and maintain a fresh look.

Can you imagine living in a place such beautiful like this?

all image credit: Architectural Digest 
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